What is lochia and types of Lochia: Lochia rubra, Lochia serosa, Lochia alba:

In the field of obstetrics, lochia is the vaginal discharge after giving birth, containing blood, mucus, and uterine tissue. Lochia discharge typically continues for four to eight weeks after childbirth, a time known as the postpartum period or puerperium. Lochia is sterile for the first two days, but not so by the third or fourth day, as the uterus begins to be colonized by vaginal commensals such as non-hemolytic streptococci and E.coli

What are the 3 different types of lochia?

There are three types of Lochia. Lochia rubra, Lochia alba and Lochia serosa are the three different stages of lochia following birth,’says Mr Downes. ‘These are the recognised types of lochia, but each woman is an individual and some stages of lochia may be shorter, or longer, than others’.

Types of Lochia

Does lochia have a smell?

Lochia is the vaginal discharge you have after a vaginal delivery. It has a stale, musty odor like menstrual discharge. Lochia for the first 3 days after delivery is dark red in color. A few small blood clots, no larger than a plum, are normal.

When does lochia start?

In the first few days after you’ve given birth, lochia can be bright red in color with a heavy volume. After about a week or so the discharge may be pinkish or brownish in color and the volume may be less. About two weeks later the discharge may become light brown or yellow in color and the amount will be much lighter.

Lochia Stages

  1. Lochia rubra (or cruenta) is the first discharge, Composed of blood, shreds of fetal membranes, decidua, vernix caseosa, lanugo and membranes. It is red in color because of the large amount of blood it contains. It lasts 1 to 4 days after birth, before easing to light “spotting”.
  2. Lochia serosa is the term for lochia that has thinned and turned brownish or pink in color. It contains serous exudate, erythrocytes, leukocytes, cervical mucus and microorganisms. This stage continues until around the tenth day after delivery. Lochia serosa which persists to some weeks after birth can indicate late postpartum hemorrhaging, and should be reported to a physician.
  3. Lochia alba (or purulenta) is the name for lochia once it has turned whitish or yellowish-white. It typically lasts from the second through the third to sixth weeks after delivery. It contains fewer red blood cells (RBCs) and is mainly made up of leukocytes, epithelial cells, cholesterol, fat, mucus and microorganisms. Continuation beyond a few weeks can indicate a genital lesion, which should be reported to a physician.

How is Lochia infection treated?

How are puerperal infections treated? Postpartum infections are most commonly treated with oral antibiotics. Your doctor may prescribe clindamycin (Cleocin) or gentamicin (Gentasol). Antibiotics will be tailored to the type of bacteria your doctor suspects caused the infection.

How do you know if your Lochia is infected?

The most common signs of postpartum infections are: Too much bleeding or hemorrhage discharge from the vagina. Foul smell coming out from the vagina. Little or no bleeding after delivery is a potential problem as well.

How do you know if Lochia has stopped?

For the first few days postpartum, you will experience a heavy flow with bright red blood and blood clots. After that, your lochia flow slows and should become lighter, with blood that is pinkish-brown. Your cervix has not closed until lochia has stopped.

Does Lochia make you itch?

For others, it can last up to six weeks. Both are totally normal. At this point though, the bleeding shouldn’t be heavy. You may start to feel vaginal itchiness, which is caused by the area starting to heal.

Complications

In general, lochia has an odor similar to that of normal menstrual fluid. Any offensive odor or change to a greenish color indicates contamination by organisms such as chlamydia or staph saprophyticus.

Lochia that is retained within the uterus is known as lochiostasis or lochioschesis, and can result in lochiometra (distention of the uterus – pushing it out of shape). Lochiorrhea describes an excessive flow of lochia and can indicate infection.

When does lochia turn red again?

If your lochia turns bright red a few weeks after it has started to change color and strength, this may be due to the remnants of a scab from the placenta site making its way out. If your bright red bleeding returns and you’re soaking through a pad an hour, or you have pain or a fever, it’s worth calling your doctor.

Why do I smell so bad postpartum?

If you’re nursing your baby, your body will emit a stronger smell through your underarm sweat than normal to help your baby find its source of food (2). This is your body’s response to naturally assist your baby in finding the breast, and will begin right after giving birth.

Should lochia be stringy?

You will notice the colour of the flow changes over time – starting off bright red, then pinkish-brown, and finally, creamy or off white coloured. It is normal for the discharge to be stringy and mucus-y and not just liquid.

How long will I have lochia after C section?

How long do you bleed for after a c-section? You will have some vaginal bleeding (called lochia) for 2–6 weeks after the birth. Bleeding sometimes lasts longer than this, but it should have stopped by 12 weeks.

How long does lochia last?

Bleeding typically lasts around for 24 to 36 days (Fletcher et al, 2012). If your lochia lasts longer that six weeks, don’t worry. That’s normal too (Fletcher et al, 2012). Bleeding will start off heavy and red to browny red.

Can you get pregnant during lochia?

No, it’s not true. It is possible to get pregnant before your periods start again after giving birth. You’ll ovulate about two weeks before you have a period. This means you’ll have been fertile again during that time but you won’t necessarily know it.

Does lochia last longer if breastfeeding?

Nursing mothers may notice an increase in lochia while breastfeeding. It will be bright red or brownish for the first few days, and then may change to pink or yellowish white. Lochia may last for up to six weeks.

Is lochia a mucus?

In the field of obstetrics, lochia is the vaginal discharge after giving birth, containing blood, mucus, and uterine tissue. Lochia discharge typically continues for four to eight weeks after childbirth, a time known as the postpartum period or puerperium.

Can you walk too much after C-section?

Try for at least a few days, if you can. Staying horizontal, not walking around too much, and keeping pressure off your pelvic floor will help with healing and minimize postpartum bleeding. Impose limits on yourself and others.

How do I know if my c-section is healing properly?

The coloration of the c-section scar should start to fade from red to pink, and it should look pretty uniform. The c-section scar should become less tender to the touch as this happens. You shouldn’t see anything seeping out of your scar, if so contact your healthcare team to ensure it’s healing correctly.

Does lochia get heavier?

Straight after the birth, the bleeding can be heavy, but it gradually gets lighter over the following days and weeks. The bleeding starts off as bright red and will be like a heavy period for around 10 days. It may get heavier around day seven for 24 hours.

What is the normal amount of lochia?

Lochia is the vaginal discharge you have after a vaginal delivery. It has a stale, musty odor like menstrual discharge. Lochia for the first 3 days after delivery is dark red in color. A few small blood clots, no larger than a plum, are normal.

How is lochia measured?

LOCHIA. Lochia is assessed during the postpartum period: Saturating one pad in less than an hour, a constant trickle of lochia, or the presence of large (i.e., golf-ball sized) blood clots is indicative of more serious complications and should be investigated immediately.

I hope that you liked this article

Thanking you!!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *